Archive for November, 2007

29
Nov

I couldn’t help it, I’m Canadian.

This is an introductory post I’ll expand on in the ‘Production Journal‘ and ‘Storyboard Like a Pro‘. If you want to do storyboards for a living and have no idea what it takes, I’ll break it down for you. No sugar-coating…you deserve that. Here we go:

TALENT

Do you have to know how to draw? Yes. How good? Pretty darn good. Do you have to be drop dead amazing? No. I’m nowhere near amazing, but I’m pretty good and get the job done. As I’ve said before, the drawings aren’t the most important thing in a board. But to work professionally, you need good solid drawing skills. And hey…amazing can’t hurt.

EDUCATION

Do you need formal training to be able to work professionally? I’d like to say ‘no’, because anything is possible, but I’d be more inclined to say ‘yes, you do’. Any kind of formal art training is great to grow as an artist. Take classes in drawing, painting or life drawing if that’s what you love. Will that alone make you a storyboard artist? Nope. If you want to work in the animation, film or gaming field, you need some training in that field. You can’t produce storyboards for an industry if you don’t know how that industry works. You must know how a cartoon is produced or a film is shot in order to storyboard for a production effectively. Even if that training is reading everything you can gets your hands on…you need it. It’s expected. >>continue reading>>

Category : Storyboard Like a Pro | Blog
22
Nov

Well, not with that attitude.

Wish you could produce your own storyboard for a short film? Not an artist? Can’t draw a straight line without a ruler?

I don’t buy it.

If you’re capable of writing your name, you can draw.

Something.

As I mentioned in a previous post, storyboards are about communication, not pretty pictures. Sure, pretty pictures help. I won’t deny that. But if these boards are just for you, or for a small group of people to work from, you can do them yourself. With some guidance and a few tips. Which you will be able to find right here…how convenient!

OK, and some practice : ). >>continue reading>>

Category : Storyboards 101 | Blog
15
Nov

The Production Journal Intro

Posted by Comments Off on The Production Journal Intro

This is the area where I’m going to ‘journal’ my next storyboarding gig. I start at the beginning of December and it goes till June 2008. I’ll tell you more information about the series when I get going. And when I find out from the studio what I can’t say.

Just so you know, I probably won’t be able to post any drawings from the shows. That whole ‘contract’ thing. But there will be lots to talk about. The process, my thoughts, which pencil I’m using…real exciting stuff ; ).

It’s a bit of an experiment that will have humour and commentary. So take this area lightly for the most part. It will be more loose and casual. With the occasional rant, I’m sure.

Should be fun.

Category : Production Journal - Kid vs Kat | Blog
13
Nov

Here’s some differences between boards done for 2D animation, 3D animation and for live action film. This is why you should know the medium that you’re boarding for. I’ll break it down this way.

For Film, the board:

  • is a great way to organize your shooting before you shell out any money
  • is a flexible plan that can change on the spot, if needed
  • is more concerned with ‘getting the shot’ so you know how to set up the camera
  • isn’t as concerned with the dialogue or acting (that’s what the actors are for)
  • is limited by what is possible with the equipment you have (don’t go planning helicopter shots if you’re doing a no-budget student film, ya know?)

For 3D (computer) animation, the board:

  • is more of a blueprint for the production
  • has some flexibility to change the shot angle or camera movement during production (but the less, the better)
  • can help save money on set construction (why build a whole location if you only need half?)
  • does plan out the dialogue and acting of the characters (then the animators take it further)
  • has unlimited possibilities with shots and camera movement (with restraint…time is money!)

For 2D animation, the board:

  • is the bible for the whole production
  • cannot (or should not) change once it’s been approved and goes into production
  • must work as a finished, edited ‘film’ with no errors when complete
  • is more limited by what is possible for camera movement and action
  • does plan out all acting and dialogue of characters

And yes, I’ll explore many of these points in more detail in future posts. Don’t worry if you don’t understand what I mean yet. This is a place to learn, remember?

Category : Storyboards 101 | Blog
13
Nov

In short, it’s a bunch of drawings that tell a story in a clear and organized manner.

“Kinda like a comic book?”

Pretty close, but with some differences. It’s a visual interpretation of a story or script that depicts every scene, action and camera movement. The storyboard has to work technically and follow the same rules as a film. Comics can be looser in format (not that I’m a big comic expert, but it’s how I see it). And you don’t put the dialogue inside little ‘bubbles’…but more on that in later posts. 🙂

So what do I mean by ‘an organized manner’?

Well, a real storyboard isn’t just a bunch of pretty pictures slapped together. Labeling is just as important as the drawings. They must have shot, scene and panel numbers and be labeled with action notes and dialogue. Without that, you’ve got nothing. At least from a professional (or practical) stand point.

Because the most important aspect of the storyboard is communication, not drawings. There are many great artists who can’t do boards. Really!

But I’m not going to sugar-coat it for those who want to do this professionally…you do have to draw well. Among many other things. Future posts, my friends.

And for those of you who think they can’t draw, fear not! For your independent projects, you can do more than you think…just stick around. I’ll have plenty of stuff to show you.

Category : Storyboards 101 | Blog
6
Nov

Hi and welcome to my very first blog. It’s a little intimidating but hey, I’m here.

I’ve been a professional storyboard artist for over ten years and want to give a little back. I’m creating a space where you can come and learn something about visual storytelling. I’ll be documenting my next boarding assignment online starting in December. Along the way I’ll be giving you some insights and feedback about the process.

I may get general. I may get specific. I may get sarcastic, but I’ll try to refrain. 🙂

As certain issues come up, I’ll give some tips about handling them. I’ll also write some educational posts about very basic boarding skills and things you should know. I’ll probably start with “So what IS a storyboard, anyway?” just to be on the safe side.

This blog will probably change and grow as I do (so be patient). I’m looking forward to the ride.

So thanks for dropping by and I hope you come back often!

-K

Category : My Two Cents | Blog
2007 November

Archive for November, 2007

29
Nov

I couldn’t help it, I’m Canadian.

This is an introductory post I’ll expand on in the ‘Production Journal‘ and ‘Storyboard Like a Pro‘. If you want to do storyboards for a living and have no idea what it takes, I’ll break it down for you. No sugar-coating…you deserve that. Here we go:

TALENT

Do you have to know how to draw? Yes. How good? Pretty darn good. Do you have to be drop dead amazing? No. I’m nowhere near amazing, but I’m pretty good and get the job done. As I’ve said before, the drawings aren’t the most important thing in a board. But to work professionally, you need good solid drawing skills. And hey…amazing can’t hurt.

EDUCATION

Do you need formal training to be able to work professionally? I’d like to say ‘no’, because anything is possible, but I’d be more inclined to say ‘yes, you do’. Any kind of formal art training is great to grow as an artist. Take classes in drawing, painting or life drawing if that’s what you love. Will that alone make you a storyboard artist? Nope. If you want to work in the animation, film or gaming field, you need some training in that field. You can’t produce storyboards for an industry if you don’t know how that industry works. You must know how a cartoon is produced or a film is shot in order to storyboard for a production effectively. Even if that training is reading everything you can gets your hands on…you need it. It’s expected. >>continue reading>>

Category : Storyboard Like a Pro | Blog
22
Nov

Well, not with that attitude.

Wish you could produce your own storyboard for a short film? Not an artist? Can’t draw a straight line without a ruler?

I don’t buy it.

If you’re capable of writing your name, you can draw.

Something.

As I mentioned in a previous post, storyboards are about communication, not pretty pictures. Sure, pretty pictures help. I won’t deny that. But if these boards are just for you, or for a small group of people to work from, you can do them yourself. With some guidance and a few tips. Which you will be able to find right here…how convenient!

OK, and some practice : ). >>continue reading>>

Category : Storyboards 101 | Blog
15
Nov

The Production Journal Intro

Posted by Comments Off on The Production Journal Intro

This is the area where I’m going to ‘journal’ my next storyboarding gig. I start at the beginning of December and it goes till June 2008. I’ll tell you more information about the series when I get going. And when I find out from the studio what I can’t say.

Just so you know, I probably won’t be able to post any drawings from the shows. That whole ‘contract’ thing. But there will be lots to talk about. The process, my thoughts, which pencil I’m using…real exciting stuff ; ).

It’s a bit of an experiment that will have humour and commentary. So take this area lightly for the most part. It will be more loose and casual. With the occasional rant, I’m sure.

Should be fun.

Category : Production Journal - Kid vs Kat | Blog
13
Nov

Here’s some differences between boards done for 2D animation, 3D animation and for live action film. This is why you should know the medium that you’re boarding for. I’ll break it down this way.

For Film, the board:

  • is a great way to organize your shooting before you shell out any money
  • is a flexible plan that can change on the spot, if needed
  • is more concerned with ‘getting the shot’ so you know how to set up the camera
  • isn’t as concerned with the dialogue or acting (that’s what the actors are for)
  • is limited by what is possible with the equipment you have (don’t go planning helicopter shots if you’re doing a no-budget student film, ya know?)

For 3D (computer) animation, the board:

  • is more of a blueprint for the production
  • has some flexibility to change the shot angle or camera movement during production (but the less, the better)
  • can help save money on set construction (why build a whole location if you only need half?)
  • does plan out the dialogue and acting of the characters (then the animators take it further)
  • has unlimited possibilities with shots and camera movement (with restraint…time is money!)

For 2D animation, the board:

  • is the bible for the whole production
  • cannot (or should not) change once it’s been approved and goes into production
  • must work as a finished, edited ‘film’ with no errors when complete
  • is more limited by what is possible for camera movement and action
  • does plan out all acting and dialogue of characters

And yes, I’ll explore many of these points in more detail in future posts. Don’t worry if you don’t understand what I mean yet. This is a place to learn, remember?

Category : Storyboards 101 | Blog
13
Nov

In short, it’s a bunch of drawings that tell a story in a clear and organized manner.

“Kinda like a comic book?”

Pretty close, but with some differences. It’s a visual interpretation of a story or script that depicts every scene, action and camera movement. The storyboard has to work technically and follow the same rules as a film. Comics can be looser in format (not that I’m a big comic expert, but it’s how I see it). And you don’t put the dialogue inside little ‘bubbles’…but more on that in later posts. 🙂

So what do I mean by ‘an organized manner’?

Well, a real storyboard isn’t just a bunch of pretty pictures slapped together. Labeling is just as important as the drawings. They must have shot, scene and panel numbers and be labeled with action notes and dialogue. Without that, you’ve got nothing. At least from a professional (or practical) stand point.

Because the most important aspect of the storyboard is communication, not drawings. There are many great artists who can’t do boards. Really!

But I’m not going to sugar-coat it for those who want to do this professionally…you do have to draw well. Among many other things. Future posts, my friends.

And for those of you who think they can’t draw, fear not! For your independent projects, you can do more than you think…just stick around. I’ll have plenty of stuff to show you.

Category : Storyboards 101 | Blog
6
Nov

Hi and welcome to my very first blog. It’s a little intimidating but hey, I’m here.

I’ve been a professional storyboard artist for over ten years and want to give a little back. I’m creating a space where you can come and learn something about visual storytelling. I’ll be documenting my next boarding assignment online starting in December. Along the way I’ll be giving you some insights and feedback about the process.

I may get general. I may get specific. I may get sarcastic, but I’ll try to refrain. 🙂

As certain issues come up, I’ll give some tips about handling them. I’ll also write some educational posts about very basic boarding skills and things you should know. I’ll probably start with “So what IS a storyboard, anyway?” just to be on the safe side.

This blog will probably change and grow as I do (so be patient). I’m looking forward to the ride.

So thanks for dropping by and I hope you come back often!

-K

Category : My Two Cents | Blog