Archive for February, 2008

26
Feb

This is the third post in a series of getting a job storyboarding professionally. I started with Training, then Building a Storyboard Portfolio and now it’s on to Professionalism.

Here is Karen J Lloyd’s official definition of professionalism:

Show up. Do the work. Don’t be an ass.

Patent pending. ;)

Sounds simple enough, doesn’t it? But I’ve seen people in animation school and on their first jobs (and beyond) violate one, two or even all three of these principals. It boggles the mind. When you get that first job, great. Now you have to keep the job.

Mind you, this could apply to any industry or job. I mean if you were an employer, wouldn’t this sum up what you’d expect at the very least out of an employee?

Let’s break it down, shall we?

SHOW UP

clock1.jpg

When I was teaching, students would just saunter in 20, 30, or in the rare cases over 60 minutes late. No excuse. No guilt. Some would think because they ‘worked late’ the night before, it was justified. Well, it’s not. And let’s face it, some of them were probably playing video games all night.

The instructors are there for a reason. To lecture, give assignments and offer feedback on your work. If you’re not there, how can you get any valuable feedback? You should be getting as much as you can. That’s how you really learn.

And don’t think instructors don’t take mental notes. They do. I know I did. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
20
Feb

pencil.jpg

Hell Week is over. I’m in recovery and I’ve promised this post, so here it is. Finally.

So far I’ve talked about Training for getting a job storyboarding professionally. Now it’s on to the portfolio.

What do you need for a storyboard portfolio?

Storyboards.

Sorry to sound so obvious, but you’d be surprised how some people expect to get a job storyboarding without any good samples. This is especially true when they’re trying to break into the animation industry. “But I can draw, see?” Um, sorry but that’s not enough.

ON A GENERAL NOTE

Students tend to put a little bit of everything into their first portfolio. Animation, character designs, layout, life drawing, backgrounds, storyboards and maybe a few other things.

On one hand it could be good to show all you can do. But on the other, it can also look like you don’t know what you want. And that can hurt you. The person trying to fill a position might pass you by because they just don’t know how to classify you. So you could be doing yourself more harm than good by including everything. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
11
Feb

I wish I could be writing more than I am these days. But I’m chained to the desk right now getting through ‘hell week’.

Which for new readers, is the final week of a storyboard schedule where I put in the long hours. This is also how I’ll be spending my birthday on Wednesday (insert sympathetic “awwwwww” here). Fun times : ).

I am putting together the post on portfolio advice and it’s turning into a bit of a long one. I don’t want to rush it, so I won’t. You should see it next week though.

In the meantime here’s some good reading.

The first is an article I came across about working for free or ‘on spec’ and the kinds of people that will approach you for it. I’ll write about this kind of thing in the future but the author pretty much reflects my point of view on this subject. Check out:

Unfinanced Entrepreneurs

The next is about freelancing and that you don’t always have to be ‘amazing’ to be successful. That’s over at Freelance Switch entitled:

Why Being An ‘Average’ Freelancer Might Be Enough

The last ones relate to the portfolio post I’m working on for you guys. These ones focus on online portfolios, while I may be focusing more on the content of a storyboard portfolio right now. The articles may not be for storyboard artists specifically, but they are for artists/designers, so you’ll find some good tips:

Creating the Perfect Portfolio

Build A Killer Online Portfolio

Hope you enjoy those. I’ll be back on track next week after I survive this one!

Subscribe to the feed or by email if you don’t want to miss my post about storyboard portfolios.

Category : Career Advice | Blog
5
Feb

Well, this is a first. I got ‘tagged’ by Heather over at Cottage Blogger. This is when bloggers write about the same topic and kind of ‘pass it on’ to other bloggers. It helps get your blog seen by some who might never look for it. Kinda cool.

The subject is ‘7 Strange But True Facts About Me’ . So if you’re interested, here we go:

  1. I’ve had a driver’s license for almost 22 years and have never owned a car. Frankly, I’ve barely driven. If you ever see me behind the wheel, you might want to steer clear. >>continue reading>>
Category : My Two Cents | Blog
2008 February

Archive for February, 2008

26
Feb

This is the third post in a series of getting a job storyboarding professionally. I started with Training, then Building a Storyboard Portfolio and now it’s on to Professionalism.

Here is Karen J Lloyd’s official definition of professionalism:

Show up. Do the work. Don’t be an ass.

Patent pending. ;)

Sounds simple enough, doesn’t it? But I’ve seen people in animation school and on their first jobs (and beyond) violate one, two or even all three of these principals. It boggles the mind. When you get that first job, great. Now you have to keep the job.

Mind you, this could apply to any industry or job. I mean if you were an employer, wouldn’t this sum up what you’d expect at the very least out of an employee?

Let’s break it down, shall we?

SHOW UP

clock1.jpg

When I was teaching, students would just saunter in 20, 30, or in the rare cases over 60 minutes late. No excuse. No guilt. Some would think because they ‘worked late’ the night before, it was justified. Well, it’s not. And let’s face it, some of them were probably playing video games all night.

The instructors are there for a reason. To lecture, give assignments and offer feedback on your work. If you’re not there, how can you get any valuable feedback? You should be getting as much as you can. That’s how you really learn.

And don’t think instructors don’t take mental notes. They do. I know I did. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
20
Feb

pencil.jpg

Hell Week is over. I’m in recovery and I’ve promised this post, so here it is. Finally.

So far I’ve talked about Training for getting a job storyboarding professionally. Now it’s on to the portfolio.

What do you need for a storyboard portfolio?

Storyboards.

Sorry to sound so obvious, but you’d be surprised how some people expect to get a job storyboarding without any good samples. This is especially true when they’re trying to break into the animation industry. “But I can draw, see?” Um, sorry but that’s not enough.

ON A GENERAL NOTE

Students tend to put a little bit of everything into their first portfolio. Animation, character designs, layout, life drawing, backgrounds, storyboards and maybe a few other things.

On one hand it could be good to show all you can do. But on the other, it can also look like you don’t know what you want. And that can hurt you. The person trying to fill a position might pass you by because they just don’t know how to classify you. So you could be doing yourself more harm than good by including everything. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
11
Feb

I wish I could be writing more than I am these days. But I’m chained to the desk right now getting through ‘hell week’.

Which for new readers, is the final week of a storyboard schedule where I put in the long hours. This is also how I’ll be spending my birthday on Wednesday (insert sympathetic “awwwwww” here). Fun times : ).

I am putting together the post on portfolio advice and it’s turning into a bit of a long one. I don’t want to rush it, so I won’t. You should see it next week though.

In the meantime here’s some good reading.

The first is an article I came across about working for free or ‘on spec’ and the kinds of people that will approach you for it. I’ll write about this kind of thing in the future but the author pretty much reflects my point of view on this subject. Check out:

Unfinanced Entrepreneurs

The next is about freelancing and that you don’t always have to be ‘amazing’ to be successful. That’s over at Freelance Switch entitled:

Why Being An ‘Average’ Freelancer Might Be Enough

The last ones relate to the portfolio post I’m working on for you guys. These ones focus on online portfolios, while I may be focusing more on the content of a storyboard portfolio right now. The articles may not be for storyboard artists specifically, but they are for artists/designers, so you’ll find some good tips:

Creating the Perfect Portfolio

Build A Killer Online Portfolio

Hope you enjoy those. I’ll be back on track next week after I survive this one!

Subscribe to the feed or by email if you don’t want to miss my post about storyboard portfolios.

Category : Career Advice | Blog
5
Feb

Well, this is a first. I got ‘tagged’ by Heather over at Cottage Blogger. This is when bloggers write about the same topic and kind of ‘pass it on’ to other bloggers. It helps get your blog seen by some who might never look for it. Kinda cool.

The subject is ‘7 Strange But True Facts About Me’ . So if you’re interested, here we go:

  1. I’ve had a driver’s license for almost 22 years and have never owned a car. Frankly, I’ve barely driven. If you ever see me behind the wheel, you might want to steer clear. >>continue reading>>
Category : My Two Cents | Blog