Archive for March, 2008

31
Mar

Aniboom_Radiohead

This was first brought to my attention by Will over at Calico Monkey and ToonBoom Tutorials (check him out if you’re interested in making your own cartoons online).

Then Aniboom contacted me direct to place an ad for the contest on my site. It’s pretty cool they found my little storyboard blog…and I get a link on their site to boot. So what the heck. 🙂

It’s a contest to create a Radiohead music video for a song off their album In Rainbows and it’s hosted by Aniboom. I can be a bit leary about ‘contests’, but this one looks pretty good.

At first they just want an animatic/storyboard that will be voted on by Radiohead, Aniboom and its community. Then the top ten winners get some cash to animate one minute of their idea. The final winner gets $10,000 to produce the whole shebang.

If you feel uneasy about the animating part and just want to storyboard it out, they even have a place to find someone to partner up with. Submissions end April 27, 2008.

If this is something that perks your interest, check out the Aniboom link or ad for all the details!

Category : My Two Cents | Blog
25
Mar

Here is Adrien’s follow-up-to-his-follow-up article about contacts in the film industry. Which followed up my article for the animation industry. This is part 4 of a 5 part series of articles about “Getting the J-O-B”. You can find the rest of the articles at the end of this post. – KJL

UNIONS AND FILM COMMISSIONS

Don’t take this the wrong way everyone, but if you want to seriously work on Hollywood productions, you have to be where the action is. (Editor’s note: There’s an AWN article on that very thing here. – KJL)

At least for a little bit (I’ll talk more on that later). Unless you’re in LA, Vancouver, New York or Toronto the only way to get on Hollywood productions is to have them come to your city. Of course, to get on them you have to be in the Union.

Here are some steps to take in that direction:

Every community has a film commission. These are the organizations that productions use in order to facilitate a location shoot. All of the resources (and budget needs) that a production requires can be obtained through them. The first thing you need to learn from the film commission is the list of the Film and Technicians Unions that serve in your community.

As a storyboard artist, you need to know this. Once you learn this, go to the Union office (don’t phone) and inquire as to whether the Union includes storyboard artists or illustrators. Don’t be surprised to find they don’t. Sometimes this is the case. If they do represent storyboard artists, then inquire about the process of applying for membership.

Remember, you must be a permittee to work on a Union shoot no matter what city you’re in. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
20
Mar

Here’s Adrien’s post to compliment mine on contacts in the industry. He gives the point of view for the live-action film industry. You can find the rest of the articles in this series of “Getting the J-O-B” at the end of the post. – KJL

FF1.jpg

Contacts in the film industry are indispensable.

Networking is the key. That said, my start in the film business came by being in the right place at the right time. Once I got my foot in the door, having that one film on my resume really opened the rest of the doors for me.

There was still a few years where animation and film overlapped for me, and during those years I pounded the film industry hard to get my name out there. A job only lasts as long as the phone call to you (I can’t even count how many jobs I lost because I was in a movie theatre). I never went to school of any kind, so I never had the jump start on contacts that Karen is talking about.

If you don’t go to school, then you’re on your own. This is where your mettle is truly tested. Your level of success depends 100% on how much you desire the work and how hard you pound that proverbial pavement. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
16
Mar

This is my forth post in the series “Getting the J-O-B”. I have addressed Training here and Adrien has given his perspective for the live-action industry here. Our Building a Storyboard Portfolio posts are here and here. And Professionalism here and here.

Now it’s on to making and keeping Contacts in the Industry.

meercats.jpg

Training is the first important key to working in the animation industry for two reasons.

First, as I’ve mentioned before, you need to know animation to work in animation. And second, school is invaluable for making your first contacts in the industry. This is where it starts. It can be a lot tougher for an ‘outsider’ to break in if they don’t know anybody. I will never say “impossible”, but I will say “harder”.

Your instructors and fellow students can help you get that first job. And jobs in the future you don’t even know about yet! That’s why I tell you in the professionalism post to treat school like a job. It’s in school where you develop your work ethic and where others can take notice of it. Don’t underestimate that.

My very first job in the industry came from a recommendation from an instructor. Word was out within the community that a certain studio was staffing up on storyboard artists. These jobs aren’t always advertised in the traditional way. They can start by getting the word out among peers and colleagues.

I had gained the respect of this instructor (and built a friendship) while in school, so he didn’t hesitate to pass my name on to that studio. Of course landing that job was ultimately up to me. I still needed a strong portfolio and do a storyboard test for them (which I’ll talk about in a future post). I did…and I got the job. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
12
Mar

Here is Adrien’s final catch-up post for the “Getting the J-O-B” series, adding to my article on Professionalism. You can find our posts on Training here and here. And the posts on Portfolios here and here. (And the pictures have nothing to do with professionalism really…it’s just Adrien’s cool stuff.) – KJL

UW2.jpg

Storyboarding for film is 80% communication and 20% drawing.

Storyboarding for animation is a lonely, isolating, mentally devastating job, where you can easily lose the charming, amiable personality you once had ‘cuz you haven’t eaten or slept properly in days (especially the last ones at the end of a show).
Editor’s note
: this is currently my life. 🙂 – KJL

In film, you can’t do that. In most cases, you’re working from a studio with 1-5 other storyboard artists. You have to get along for the long 12 hour days that you’ll be there. Most importantly you have be charming and personable when you have impromptu meetings with the director.

Let him direct you. In other words, you are a monkey with a pencil and if he/she could do it herself, they would. Do what you’re told. If they direct you to “cross the line” in the action, point it out politely. There are times when it is OK to do it and it might be a style thing they’re doing. Then again…it might not. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
10
Mar

Here’s Adrien’s second post in the series of ‘Getting the J-O-B’. This time he’s adding to my post on Building a Storyboard Portfolio.

It’s a short one, so enjoy his drawings! – KJL

SCC1.gif

Karen is correct…never have animation boards in your portfolio when showing to a live action client. I’ve tried and it just gets embarrassing.

So, live action storyboards is all that should be in there. Only your latest work. As they say, you’re only as good as your last job. But…maybe your last job was top secret (usually is).

You may show them, but never leave behind a copy and never leave them unattended. Sounds crazy, but a small mistake like this can ruin your career. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
5
Mar

This is Adrien Van Viersen’s premiere guest post! He’s going to expand on my first article in the series of “Getting the J-O-B” about Training. (In case you don’t know, P.O.V. means point of view.) -KJL

SCC Storyboard Panel 1

I completely agree with Karen on the training aspect. You simply can’t go into animation storyboarding without some training in the field, or at school. I learned storyboarding on the job at an animation studio, first as a clean up artist and then as a revisionist. Only after a year of doing these things was I allowed to tackle a show.

And even then, I wasn’t given a whole show. I was given an act. This way, if I screwed up, the show wouldn’t be in in trouble ‘cuz they’d have my act done at the same time the other acts were being done.

If you want to get into storyboarding animation, but you don’t want to go to school ‘cuz yer a really good drawer, you can do it the way I did and get in by designing backgrounds. Not a bad way to start.

You can then learn all the other aspects of the field through osmosis and study the boards being produced in the office. Then you volunteer to revise them. Nobody WANTS to do this job, so people will look at you like you’re insane. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
2008 March

Archive for March, 2008

31
Mar

Aniboom_Radiohead

This was first brought to my attention by Will over at Calico Monkey and ToonBoom Tutorials (check him out if you’re interested in making your own cartoons online).

Then Aniboom contacted me direct to place an ad for the contest on my site. It’s pretty cool they found my little storyboard blog…and I get a link on their site to boot. So what the heck. 🙂

It’s a contest to create a Radiohead music video for a song off their album In Rainbows and it’s hosted by Aniboom. I can be a bit leary about ‘contests’, but this one looks pretty good.

At first they just want an animatic/storyboard that will be voted on by Radiohead, Aniboom and its community. Then the top ten winners get some cash to animate one minute of their idea. The final winner gets $10,000 to produce the whole shebang.

If you feel uneasy about the animating part and just want to storyboard it out, they even have a place to find someone to partner up with. Submissions end April 27, 2008.

If this is something that perks your interest, check out the Aniboom link or ad for all the details!

Category : My Two Cents | Blog
25
Mar

Here is Adrien’s follow-up-to-his-follow-up article about contacts in the film industry. Which followed up my article for the animation industry. This is part 4 of a 5 part series of articles about “Getting the J-O-B”. You can find the rest of the articles at the end of this post. – KJL

UNIONS AND FILM COMMISSIONS

Don’t take this the wrong way everyone, but if you want to seriously work on Hollywood productions, you have to be where the action is. (Editor’s note: There’s an AWN article on that very thing here. – KJL)

At least for a little bit (I’ll talk more on that later). Unless you’re in LA, Vancouver, New York or Toronto the only way to get on Hollywood productions is to have them come to your city. Of course, to get on them you have to be in the Union.

Here are some steps to take in that direction:

Every community has a film commission. These are the organizations that productions use in order to facilitate a location shoot. All of the resources (and budget needs) that a production requires can be obtained through them. The first thing you need to learn from the film commission is the list of the Film and Technicians Unions that serve in your community.

As a storyboard artist, you need to know this. Once you learn this, go to the Union office (don’t phone) and inquire as to whether the Union includes storyboard artists or illustrators. Don’t be surprised to find they don’t. Sometimes this is the case. If they do represent storyboard artists, then inquire about the process of applying for membership.

Remember, you must be a permittee to work on a Union shoot no matter what city you’re in. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
20
Mar

Here’s Adrien’s post to compliment mine on contacts in the industry. He gives the point of view for the live-action film industry. You can find the rest of the articles in this series of “Getting the J-O-B” at the end of the post. – KJL

FF1.jpg

Contacts in the film industry are indispensable.

Networking is the key. That said, my start in the film business came by being in the right place at the right time. Once I got my foot in the door, having that one film on my resume really opened the rest of the doors for me.

There was still a few years where animation and film overlapped for me, and during those years I pounded the film industry hard to get my name out there. A job only lasts as long as the phone call to you (I can’t even count how many jobs I lost because I was in a movie theatre). I never went to school of any kind, so I never had the jump start on contacts that Karen is talking about.

If you don’t go to school, then you’re on your own. This is where your mettle is truly tested. Your level of success depends 100% on how much you desire the work and how hard you pound that proverbial pavement. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
16
Mar

This is my forth post in the series “Getting the J-O-B”. I have addressed Training here and Adrien has given his perspective for the live-action industry here. Our Building a Storyboard Portfolio posts are here and here. And Professionalism here and here.

Now it’s on to making and keeping Contacts in the Industry.

meercats.jpg

Training is the first important key to working in the animation industry for two reasons.

First, as I’ve mentioned before, you need to know animation to work in animation. And second, school is invaluable for making your first contacts in the industry. This is where it starts. It can be a lot tougher for an ‘outsider’ to break in if they don’t know anybody. I will never say “impossible”, but I will say “harder”.

Your instructors and fellow students can help you get that first job. And jobs in the future you don’t even know about yet! That’s why I tell you in the professionalism post to treat school like a job. It’s in school where you develop your work ethic and where others can take notice of it. Don’t underestimate that.

My very first job in the industry came from a recommendation from an instructor. Word was out within the community that a certain studio was staffing up on storyboard artists. These jobs aren’t always advertised in the traditional way. They can start by getting the word out among peers and colleagues.

I had gained the respect of this instructor (and built a friendship) while in school, so he didn’t hesitate to pass my name on to that studio. Of course landing that job was ultimately up to me. I still needed a strong portfolio and do a storyboard test for them (which I’ll talk about in a future post). I did…and I got the job. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
12
Mar

Here is Adrien’s final catch-up post for the “Getting the J-O-B” series, adding to my article on Professionalism. You can find our posts on Training here and here. And the posts on Portfolios here and here. (And the pictures have nothing to do with professionalism really…it’s just Adrien’s cool stuff.) – KJL

UW2.jpg

Storyboarding for film is 80% communication and 20% drawing.

Storyboarding for animation is a lonely, isolating, mentally devastating job, where you can easily lose the charming, amiable personality you once had ‘cuz you haven’t eaten or slept properly in days (especially the last ones at the end of a show).
Editor’s note
: this is currently my life. 🙂 – KJL

In film, you can’t do that. In most cases, you’re working from a studio with 1-5 other storyboard artists. You have to get along for the long 12 hour days that you’ll be there. Most importantly you have be charming and personable when you have impromptu meetings with the director.

Let him direct you. In other words, you are a monkey with a pencil and if he/she could do it herself, they would. Do what you’re told. If they direct you to “cross the line” in the action, point it out politely. There are times when it is OK to do it and it might be a style thing they’re doing. Then again…it might not. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
10
Mar

Here’s Adrien’s second post in the series of ‘Getting the J-O-B’. This time he’s adding to my post on Building a Storyboard Portfolio.

It’s a short one, so enjoy his drawings! – KJL

SCC1.gif

Karen is correct…never have animation boards in your portfolio when showing to a live action client. I’ve tried and it just gets embarrassing.

So, live action storyboards is all that should be in there. Only your latest work. As they say, you’re only as good as your last job. But…maybe your last job was top secret (usually is).

You may show them, but never leave behind a copy and never leave them unattended. Sounds crazy, but a small mistake like this can ruin your career. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog
5
Mar

This is Adrien Van Viersen’s premiere guest post! He’s going to expand on my first article in the series of “Getting the J-O-B” about Training. (In case you don’t know, P.O.V. means point of view.) -KJL

SCC Storyboard Panel 1

I completely agree with Karen on the training aspect. You simply can’t go into animation storyboarding without some training in the field, or at school. I learned storyboarding on the job at an animation studio, first as a clean up artist and then as a revisionist. Only after a year of doing these things was I allowed to tackle a show.

And even then, I wasn’t given a whole show. I was given an act. This way, if I screwed up, the show wouldn’t be in in trouble ‘cuz they’d have my act done at the same time the other acts were being done.

If you want to get into storyboarding animation, but you don’t want to go to school ‘cuz yer a really good drawer, you can do it the way I did and get in by designing backgrounds. Not a bad way to start.

You can then learn all the other aspects of the field through osmosis and study the boards being produced in the office. Then you volunteer to revise them. Nobody WANTS to do this job, so people will look at you like you’re insane. >>continue reading>>

Category : Career Advice | Blog